Forestry
24
      
JULY/AUGUST 2007
There appears to be a lot of mis-
conception about the effective-
ness of reduced impact logging 
in the Southeast Asia, as nations 
are continuously under scrutiny 
for their harvesting practices. In 
this report, Dr. Jegatheswaran 
Ratnasingam gives an independ-
ent assessment of the effective-
ness of RIL practices in SEA, and 
its challenges. 
I
n recent years, a great deal 
of attention has focused on 
reduced impact logging (RIL), as 
most Southeast Asian countries, 
especially Malaysia and Indonesia, 
move toward sustainable forest 
management. While there are some 
who insist that the only way to 
protect forests from destruction is to 
ban all forms of timber harvesting, 
economists have been quick to 
point out that if timber production 
were to cease, tropical forests would 
be viewed by many governments 
and individuals as a resource of 
little value, perhaps more logically 
and profitably converted to their 
productive uses. Hence, there are a 
growing number of pragmatists who 
promote the improved management of 
the majority of the world’s forest that 
will likely remain outside protected 
forest areas. They contend that 
improved logging can greatly reduce 
damage to forests, and help maintain 
a natural resource whose productive 
and sustainable use is important to 
many national economies. 
However, even proponents 
of RIL recognize that RIL alone 
will not bring about sustainable 
forest management – it may be a 
necessary condition, but it is not a 
sufficient one. There are a number 
of linkages between RIL and other 
necessary conditions for sustainable 
forest management. The existing 
linkages between RIL, illegal logging, 
profitability of logging operations 
and forest law enforcement must be 
addressed. The link between illegal 
logging and RIL may not be readily 
obvious, since the application of 
RIL neither stops illegal logging nor 
the trade of illegally cut timber. The 
links only become apparent when 
examining the impediments to the 
adoption of RIL, and in particular, 
the effects that illegal logging has 
no profitability and decision making 
by forest concessionaires.
The principles of Reduced Im-
pact Logging (RIL)
RIL is actually a package of practices 
and technologies. RIL is nothing 
new for the most part; it is simply 
the transfer of well-established 
approaches from temperate forests 
to the tropics. Although practices 
vary somewhat according to local 
conditions and circumstances, RIL 
generally includes the following:
(1) Pre-harvest inventory and mapping 
of individual crop trees.
(2) Pre-harvest planning of roads, 
skid trails and landings to provide 
access to the harvest area and 
to the individual trees scheduled 
for harvest while minimizing soil 
disturbances and protecting 
streams and waterways with 
appropriate crossings.
(3)  Pre-harvest vine cutting in areas 
where vines bridge across tree 
crowns. 
(4) The use of appropriate felling and 
bucking techniques, including 
directional felling, cutting stumps 
low to the ground to avoid waste, 
and optimal crosscutting of tree 
stems into logs in a way that 
will maximize recovery of useful 
wood.
(5) Construction of roads, landings 
and skid trails so that they adhere 
to engineering and environmental 
design guidelines.
(6) Winching logs to planned skid 
trails and ensuring that skidding 
machines remain on the skid 
trails at all times.
(7) Where feasible, utilizing yarding 
systems that protect soils and 
residual vegetation by suspending 
logs above the ground.
(8) Conducting a post-harvest 
assessment in order to provide 
feedback to the concession 
holder and logging crews and 
to evaluate the degree to which 
RIL guidelines were successfully 
applied.
On this account, it is clear that 
RIL involves systematic harvesting 
operation, which ensures minimal 
damage to the forest stand. However, 
the opponents of RIL have argued 
that RIL will incur higher costs, and 
therefore, the benefits to be gained 
are indeed minimal.
Benefits of RIL
When properly applied, these 
techniques can have dramatic 
results. A recent review of more 
than 200 studies and articles on 
RIL and conventional logging in 
tropical forests revealed the following 
environmental benefits from RIL:
The effectiveness of Reduced 
Impact Logging: A review of its 
status in Southeast Asia